National Recovery Month

Recognizing National Recovery Month

Every September National Recovery Month, a national observance held to increase awareness of mental and/or substance use disorders, celebrates individuals in long-term recovery, and acknowledge the work of prevention, treatment, and recovery services. There are millions of Americans whose lives have been transformed through recovery, but these successes often go unnoticed by the public. Recovery month celebrates the gains made by those in recovery, showing public support in the way that we celebrate those making other health transformations.

During Recovery Month participants work to educate Americans about substance use treatments and mental health services, and how they can enable those with a mental and/or substance use disorder to live a healthy and rewarding life. What began in 1989 as Treatment Works! Month, which honored the work of substance use professionals, has evolved over its 27-year history to become what it is today. Recovery Month now highlights the achievements of individuals who have reclaimed their lives in long-term recovery, honors the treatment and recovery service providers who make recovery possible, and promotes the message that recovery in all of its forms is possible when the proper prevention, treatment, and recovery services are available.

Each September during Recovery Month, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services releases the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. This survey is the primary source of information on the prevalence and impact of mental and/or substance use disorders nationwide. Some of these statistics have been included below:

  • By 2020, mental and substance use disorders will surpass all physical diseases as a major cause of disability worldwide.
  • Among adults aged 18 or older, 43.6 million (18.1 percent of adults) had any mental illness in the past year.
  • The percentage of adults who had co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorder in the past year was highest among adults aged 18 to 25, at nearly 30%.
  • More than 7.9 million U.S. adults reported having co-occurring disorders. This means that in the past year they have had any mental illness and a substance use disorder.
  • Among people aged 12 or older, 21.5 million people (8.1 percent of this population) were classified with substance dependence or abuse in the past year.
  • Research shows that family supports play a major role in helping to prevent mental and/or substance use disorders, identifying when someone has a problem, and connecting those in need with treatment resources and services.

To learn more about National Recovery Month, how you can get involved, and to find local events, please visit www.recoverymonth.gov. If you or someone you know is suffering from a substance use disorder or co-occurring disorder, the professionals at Silicon Beach Outpatient Center can help, please call us today at 310.846.8215.

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